Ezra Macvie

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by Ruth Gay. Yale University Press, New Haven, 2002, 347 pp. Perhaps unintentionally, the title of this fascinating study of the infamous Displaced-Persons camps in postwar Germany is very generous to Germans. It suggests that, in some act of contrition, those Germans who survived World War II willingly opened their …

by Shlomo Sand, Verso, Brooklyn 2010 (second edition), 325 pp., with index "Behind every act in Israel’s identity politics stretches, like a long black shadow, the idea of an eternal people and race."—Shlomo Sand, The Invention of the Jewish People, p. 280 This book reports the history of a history. …

Sony Pictures Classics, 2012, 147 mins. West of Memphis is about the discovery in 1993 of the bodies of three local boys about eight years old, hog-tied, beaten and lacerated, in a marsh in Arkansas about 24 hours after they were last seen alive. The incident has become famous in …

by Keith Lowe, St. Martin’s Press, 2012, 460 pp. Keith Lowe is a professional historian in every sense, most of them good. He is not only diligent, energetic, insightful, and scrupulous, he is also imaginative in the best ways, and an engaging writer of prose. Being young, he has his …

The Holocaust in American Life, by Peter Novick, Mariner Books, New York, 1999, 373 pp. Sometime very late in the Twentieth Century, Jewish Historian Peter Novick chose to write a book whose title very aptly described its subject, The Holocaust in American Life. Clearly, based on a reading of the …

Around the age of fifty, Steven Spielberg discovered the thing he was put on this earth to do: tell the story of the Holocaust, the subject of his movie Schindler’s List, which reaped seven Oscar Awards. In this monumentally successful Jewish billionaire, the Holocaust According to Spielberg found a truly …

Inside the Gas Chambers, by Carlo Mattogno. The Barnes Review, Washington, DC, 267 pp. $25 Inside the Gas Chambers: The Extermination of Mainstream Holocaust Historiography by Carlo Mattogno. The “Holocaust debate” is, at least for the defenders of the regnant account, something of a kabuki dance. The tiny, furious cadre …

Breaking the Spell. The Holocaust: Myth and Reality. Nicholas Kollerstrom. Castle Hill Publishers, Uckfield, UK,[1] 2014. 256 pp., including index. "Breaking the Spell," by Nicholas Kollerstrom Published with permission from Castle Hill Publishers Dr. Nicholas Kollerstrom, recently of University College London, is a 21st-century Holocaust victim—perhaps a Holocaust survivor, …

The second edition of Dalton's Debating the Holocaust is here, and the mask is down: Dalton admits to be a Holocaust revisionist; this edition is "more-credible", "attractive" "punctilious," of "quality," and "as up-to-the-minute as any fixed body of work could be"...

This book’s author, a Danish journalist now 57 years old despite the many death threats he has received, was catapulted to fame, to his great surprise, after the publication by his employer of a group of cartoons depicting Islam’s central prophet Mohammed in a number of unflattering, even risible poses. …

Where did those evil Nazis get their idea to enact laws discriminating against people for their (alleged) race? Well, they were inspired by laws of the glorious United States of America. Read this book review to find out more.

Hellishly flaming crematoria; lines of doomed Jews trudging through the snow from cattle cars; heartless selections; gas chambers! The story, loosely put together during the war, really took off when Auschwitz Commandant Rudolf Höss "confessed." A new book on his post-war fate sheds light on what the tales from his mouth a worth.

The Gas Chamber of Sherlock Holmes: And Other Writings on the Holocaust, Revisionism, and Historical Understanding by Samuel Crowell, Nine Banded Books, Charleston, W. Va., 2011. 401pp. Indexed. The account of the Holocaust that reigns today is itself a historical phenomenon. Many who have given its content close attention and …

By Gilad Atzmon. Zero Books, Washington, D.C, 2011, 202 pp. US $14.95/UK £8.99 Cover reproduced with permission of Gilad Atzmon In a way, this latest book by Israeli-British saxophonist-commentator Gilad Atzmon is a case study. It is a study of the situation of mastery by a Zionist cabal over the …

By Evan Burr Bukey, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N. C., 2000, 320 pp. In 1938, if you were an Austrian over forty, you, or your brothers, husband, sons, had fought on the losing side of the Great War, and seen the former Austro-Hungarian empire cut up after …

By Nassim Nicholas Taleb. Penguin Group, New York, 2010, 379 pp. This book is about the profound subjects of thinking, knowing, understanding, and then acting (or just as often, refraining from acting) on understanding. While it concentrates on how to think, know, and understand, it necessarily, and very valuably, strays …

By Erik Larson. Crown Publishing Group, New York, 2011, 448 pp. By June 1933, the “Nazis”—a new word in the world’s lexicon—had held power in Germany for almost six months, and were not expected to last, unlikely characters as virtually all of them were. The American ambassador to Germany had …

Spotlight. Open Road Films, 2015, 129 mins. The eternal enemy of truth—and history—is taboo. Taboo is the enveloping social process by which knowledge is contained by suppressing its expression. First among those subjected to taboo are the direct witnesses to the knowledge, and first among these are those who have …

Look Who's Back! Constantin Film. 116 minutes He/it is the most-delicate subject in Germany, perhaps even the world, at least since the time he was alive (1889-1945). This is more-so in Germany, the country whose government he controlled in the last 12 years of his life, than anywhere else. In …

The Normandy Diary of Marie-Louise Osmont. George L. Newman (translator). Random House, New York, 1994, 113 pp. In 1940, the widow Marie-Louise Osmont owned and lived in a manoir in Périers-sur-le-Dan in Normandy, France, and experienced the invasion and occupation by Germany’s Wehrmacht up-close and personally:  troops encamped on her …