Weimar Germany

Germany’s 1918 transition from constitutional, parliamentary monarchy to democratic republic was not the result of a self-determined evolution, but rather an Allied settlement foisted upon Germany as a consequence of its defeat in WWI. Hence, a sizable portion of the German populace was disgruntled with the new régime right from the start. Weimar's problems were compounded by the fact that the Allied powers, fearing a strong and healthy rival, did their utmost to destabilize Germany.



Rebel Patriot: A Biography of Franz von Papen, by Henry M. and Robin K. Adams. Santa Barbara, CA: McNally and Loftin, 1987, 513 pages, $29.95, ISBN 0-87461-065-6. Professor Henry M. Adams (University of California, Santa Barbara), born in 1907, first met Franz von Papen while a student in Berlin in …

German Big Business and the Rise of Hitler, by Henry Ashby Turner, Jr. New York: Oxford University Press 1985. Hardbound, 487 pages, $25.00, ISBN 0-10-503492-9. A good portion of the the accepted legacy of German big business and its alleged role in the establishment of the Third Reich rests on …

A lengthy page-one, six column article in the Sunday, 23 December 1984 New York Times (Colin Campbell, “History and Ethics: A Dispute,” pp. 1, 35) brought to the attention of the general public for the first time the facts about a controversy within the halls of mainstream historical scholarship that …

What exactly did the NSDAP (National Socialist German Worker's Party) represent and who were its founding members? Why and how did Adolf Hitler transform the party from an unimpressive proletariat workers’ party to a full-fledged political machine that obtained absolute power in Germany? Perhaps more important, how was it funded? …