Stutthof

According to orthodox historians, the concentration camp near the West-Prussian town Stutthof (close to the city of Danzig) is said to have served as an “auxiliary extermination camp” by way of gassing inmates in a small disinfestation room with Zyklon B. A thorough study of the extant evidence shows, however, that this story doesn’t hold water.



While Stutthof is not as well known as other wartime German camps, a close look at the history of this important internment center actually tells more about the reality of the Third Reich’s “final solution” policy than studies of much better known camps such as Dachau or Buchenwald. In particular, …

Jürgen Graf, Carlo Mattogno, Concentration Camp Stutthof and Its Function in the National Socialist Jewish Policy, Theses and Dissertations Press, Chicago 2003, 122 pp., $15.- Among the concentration camps of National Socialist Germany, Stutthof has remained something of a stepchild. Established near Danzig at the start of the Second World …

According to communist literature, the Stutthof camp was a "makeshift" extermination camp within the framework of the so-called "Final Solution of the Jewish Question" in 1944. Jürgen Graf and Carlo Mattogno have examined this view of Stutthof. Not only do the authors prove that the Stutthof camp did not serve as a 'makeshift' extermination camp…