Vol. 14, No. 2 ∙ www.InconvenientHistory.com ∙ 2022

Inconvenient History seeks to revive the true spirit of the historical revisionist movement; a movement that was established primarily to foster peace through an objective understanding of the causes of modern warfare.


To browse the contents of this issue, click on the individual papers listed below.



Sophie Scholl is one of the most famous members of the German resistance movement during World War II. She and her brother Hans took enormous risks to undermine Adolf Hitler’s power. Hans and Sophie Scholl were dead at ages 24 and 21, respectively, so they left behind no careers or life’s work. However, a series of actions over the course of only six or seven months have made them world famous and national heroes in modern Germany. This article discuses the short life of Sophie Scholl, and why she was so determined to end Hitler’s reign.

 

Ernst Kaltenbrunner was chief of the Reich Main Office for Security (RSHA) from January 1943 until the end of World War II. In this position, he directed the operations of the Secret State Police (Gestapo), the Criminal Police (Kripo), and the Security Service (SD). Of the German leaders who stood before the International Military Tribunal (IMT) in 1945, few inspired more revulsion and contempt than Kaltenbrunner. This article examines the life of Kaltenbrunner, and whether or not the accusations made against him at the IMT are true.

 

 

German historian Dr. Peter Longerich’s latest book Wannsee: The Road to the Final Solution documents the alleged importance of the Wannsee Conference held in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee on January 20, 1942. Longerich writes that this conference's “minutes are unique because, more than any other document, they demonstrate with total clarity the decision-making process that led to the murder of the European Jews.” This article discusses whether these minutes actually document “with total clarity” the decision-making process that led to the so-called Holocaust.

Sean McMeekin is a professor of history at Bard College in upstate New York. Stalin’s War: A New History of World War II is McMeekin’s latest book that focuses on Josef Stalin’s involvement in World War II. This well-researched and well-written book uses new research in Soviet, European and American archives to prove that World War II was a war that Stalin had wanted—not Adolf Hitler. A remarkable feature of Stalin’s War is McMeekin’s documentation showing the extensive aid given by the United States and Great Britain to support Soviet Communism during the war. This article focuses on the lend-lease and other aid given to the Soviet Union during World War II which enabled Stalin to conquer most of Eurasia, from Berlin to Beijing, for Communism.

After invading Ukraine, the Russian government threatens to nuke Europe and the US in order to stop them from supporting Ukraine. Blissfully ignorant of the facts, and utterly disinformed by government media, the Russian people support to a large degree their government's actions. What does that tell us about the importance of freedom of speech?