Ghettos

The ghettos created by the Third Reich authorities to concentrate and exploit Jews.

The Ghetto of Lodz in Holocaust Propaganda

style=”margin-bottom: 0.14in”>The Lodz Ghetto was, after Warsaw, the second-largest Jewish ghetto in Poland during the Second World War. It was established in February 1940, and counted 140,000 occupants by the end of that year. Because of the enormous number of everyday objects of all kinds produced there, particularly in the area of textiles, the ghetto rapidly became a critical center of production for the German economy. In the summer of 1944, the ghetto was dissolved, and all inhabitants transferred elsewhere. The orthodoxy insists that they were all murdered around that time, some of them first to Chelmno, then the rest to Auschwitz. This article follows the documental trail of these Jews and shows, that the orthodox narrative his highly flawed.

The “Warsaw Ghetto Boy”

It is probably the single most widely recognized and memorable Holocaust image of all: a frightened and apparently doomed young boy, his arms upraised, standing with other Warsaw ghetto Jews under the watch of an armed German soldier. In a recent essay, Erwin Knoll, editor of the influential monthly The Progressive, aptly sums up the…

The Warsaw Ghetto “Uprising”

Robert Faurisson. Europe's foremost Holocaust revisionist scholar, is a frequent Journal contributor. He wishes to express his gratitude to Theodore J. O'Keefe for translating the original text, and to Mark Weber for providing much additional information that has been incorporated into this revised text. Each year, around April 19, the media and politicians commemorate what…

A Ghetto Fighter Recalls Her Capture

Young women fighters rounded up during the 1943 German action against the Warsaw ghetto are shown in this widely-reproduced photograph. Like the famous “ghetto boy” photo, this was included in the 1943 “Stroop report.” The original caption read: “Women of the He-halutz movement, captured with weapons.” (“He-halutz” or “Hechalutz” [“pioneer”] was an important Zionist youth…

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