No. 2

Vol. 4, No. 2 · www.InconvenientHistory.org · 2012

Inconvenient History seeks to revive the true spirit of the historical revisionist movement; a movement that was established primarily to foster peace through an objective understanding of the causes of modern warfare.

To browse the contents of this issue, click on the individual papers listed below.

Christian Gerlach and the “Extermination Camp” at Mogilev

Christian Gerlach’s article, “Failure of Plans for an SS Extermination Camp in Mogilev, Byelorussia”[1] is a typical example of the historically baseless conclusions reached by Holocaust historians due to their technical ignorance, particularly in the field of crematory ovens and cremation. The article attempts to deduce an intention, on the part of the SS, to…

Historical Revisionism and “Relativising the Holocaust'

Whether the received wisdom on an historical event can be subjected to scholarly scrutiny depends upon the method by which the subject is utilized by entrenched interests. Hence, let the scholar or student who embarks on the questioning of certain sacred cows beware lest he be damned for heresy. This essay examines a polemical technique…

John Demjanjuk: The Man More Sinned Against

I am a man more sinned against than sinning!” (King Lear in Shakespeare’s King Lear) John Demjanjuk is dead. The Age, Melbourne’s more intellectual daily newspaper, reported this on 19th March under the prejudicial and ambiguous heading ‘Nazi camp guard dead.’ Quoting the Washington Post, the newspaper referred to Demjanjuk as ‘the target of a…

The Clash of the Nobelists

Nobel-Prize-winning German writer Günter Grass sent shock waves through the international community when, on April 4, he published a poem in the Süddeutsche Zeitung titled “What Must Be Said.” In that poem, for his first time, he voiced his deep concerns about the fact that his country was supplying to Israel, a nuclear power, submarines…

A Postcard from Auschwitz

The following is a true account of my personal visit to the camp. All photos are my own. Krakow is a beautiful city in early summer, the stand-out among southern Polish cities. Miraculously, the old city center survived both world wars unscathed. The huge central square is a sight to behold, and with no less than…

Night

By Elie Wiesel. Bantam Books, New York, 1982, 109 pp. In Night, written by Elie Wiesel, winner of the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize for literature, has, for such a small book, a very large reputation. I hasten to mention, however, the Bantam Books edition I am reviewing boasts the complete text of the original hardcover,…

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